Chinese Journal of Physiology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 64  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 218--224

Does positive feeling lead to more impulsiveness? – Implication of previous rewarded experience on location-dependent motoric impulsivity


Tsung-Hua Chen1, Yu-Jung Chen2, Teng-Shun Huang3, Michael Hsiao4, Chen-Cheng Lin5, Yia-Ping Liu6 
1 Department of Physiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
2 Department of Psychiatry, Hualien Armed Forces General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan
3 Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
4 Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
5 Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Defense Medical Center; Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica; Department of Psychiatry, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
6 Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Defense Medical Center; Department of Psychiatry, Cheng Hsin General Hospital; Department of Psychiatry, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chen-Cheng Lin
Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529
Taiwan
Dr. Yia-Ping Liu
Department of Physiology, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 11490
Taiwan

Positive feeling or rewarding experience is crucial for individuals to operative their cognitive activities via an outcome evaluation of incentive reinforcement. For a long time, rewarding process or outcome evaluation is assumed greatly influenced by neuronal construct that holds individuals' impulsiveness, a capacity to inhibit unwanted behaviors provoked in a given situation. In the present study, we proposed that the outcome evaluation or rewarding experience can influence the occurrence of impulsiveness too. We hypothesized that animals would be more likely to deliver impulsive action in the place where it was previously associated with reinforcing process, in which central dopamine may play an important role. By employing five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), we examined whether one of the five holes where rats made a correct response to get the reward would gain a higher probability to deliver premature or perseverative activities than other holes in the next trial of 5-CSRTT under baseline or longer waiting period condition. The effects of D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 were also evaluated in the above paradigm. We demonstrated that (i) the influence on motoric impulsive response from previous rewarded experience can be described in a behavioral paradigm such as the 5-CSRTT, (ii) both prematures and perseverations at the hole associated with previous rewarding were about one-fifth of probability, however were statistically not correlated unless the interventions of inter-trial interval = 7 plus SCH23390, and (iii) the hole associated with the positive reinforcement of the 5-CSRTT appears more likely for rats to carry out an intuitive impetus under SCH23390 in a longer waiting condition. Our results may shed some insight toward the role of rewarding process in impulsive behavior.


How to cite this article:
Chen TH, Chen YJ, Huang TS, Hsiao M, Lin CC, Liu YP. Does positive feeling lead to more impulsiveness? – Implication of previous rewarded experience on location-dependent motoric impulsivity.Chin J Physiol 2021;64:218-224


How to cite this URL:
Chen TH, Chen YJ, Huang TS, Hsiao M, Lin CC, Liu YP. Does positive feeling lead to more impulsiveness? – Implication of previous rewarded experience on location-dependent motoric impulsivity. Chin J Physiol [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 3 ];64:218-224
Available from: https://www.cjphysiology.org/article.asp?issn=0304-4920;year=2021;volume=64;issue=5;spage=218;epage=224;aulast=Chen;type=0